478 notes
posted 1 year ago (by: thereligionofpeace)
thereligionofpeace:

Turkey lifts ban on headscarves in schools
“Let’s allow everyone to dress their child as they wish, according to their means,” — Recep Tayyip Erdogan, Prime Minister of Turkey
The Guardian
Photograph: Kerim Okten/EPA

thereligionofpeace:

Turkey lifts ban on headscarves in schools

“Let’s allow everyone to dress their child as they wish, according to their means,” — Recep Tayyip Erdogan, Prime Minister of Turkey

The Guardian

Photograph: Kerim Okten/EPA

174 notes
posted 1 year ago (by: rimadadenji)
Those who come to Islam because they wish to draw closer to God have no problem with a multiform Islam radiating from a single revealed paradigmatic core. But those who come to Islam seeking an identity will find the multiplicity of traditional Muslim cultures intolerable. People with confused identities are attracted to totalitarian solutions. And today, many young Muslims feel so threatened by the diversity of calls on their allegiance, and by the sheer complexity of modernity, that the only form of Islam they can regard as legitimate is a totalitarian, monolithic one. That there should be four schools of Islamic law is to them unbearable. That Muslim cultures should legitimately differ is a species of blasphemy.
- An excerpt from a lecture by Sheikh Abdel Hakim Murad (Tim Winter) given to a conference of British converts on September 17 1997  (via thalamtnafsee)
64 notes
posted 1 year ago (by: mosbroke-deactivated20131216)
The Mind Is Limitless: thalamtnafsee: moslike: If you ask the average Muslim if he lies, he...

thalamtnafsee:

moslike:

If you ask the average Muslim if he lies, he will most likely admit to have lied in the past, but is trying hard not to be a liar. If you ask him if he has done wrong or committed an injustice then you might get a similar response. Same with being ungrateful,…

123 notes
posted 1 year ago (by: partytilfajr)

partytilfajr:

There is a Hadith Qudsi, reported in both Bukhari and Muslim, where God says:

“I am as the perception/assumption of My slave.”

This means that if you think of God in a certain way, He will be that way. So if you see God as merciful, you will seek mercy; if you think God is only angry, that is all you will see.

3 notes
posted 1 year ago (by: draculaqueefa)
56 notes
posted 1 year ago (by: themindislimitless)
There is nothing in our book, the Qur’an, that teaches us to suffer peacefully. Our religion teaches us to be intelligent. Be peaceful, be courteous, obey the law, respect everyone; but if someone lays a hand on you, send him to the cemetery.
- Malcolm X (via themindislimitless)
10 notes
posted 1 year ago (by: 404errrors)
fattysaid:

“A Palestinian Muslim worshiper walks in an alley of Jerusalem’s Old City, on her way to pray at the Al Aqsa Mosque on the third Friday of Ramadan, 2010.” 
By: (AP Photo/Bernat Armangue)

fattysaid:

A Palestinian Muslim worshiper walks in an alley of Jerusalem’s Old City, on her way to pray at the Al Aqsa Mosque on the third Friday of Ramadan, 2010.”

By: (AP Photo/Bernat Armangue)

38 notes
posted 1 year ago (by: thegreaterjihad)
You Shall Return: Things Muslim women get told at the mosque by old aunties: Sister,...

thegreaterjihad:

Things Muslim women get told at the mosque by old aunties:

  • Sister, your feet are showing. You know that invalidates your salat.
  • Your prayer clothes are see-through. You know this invalidates every salat you have made in them.
  • Sister, there are four strands of hair hanging out of your hijab….
What I Remembered in this Lifetime: Frank Ocean's Bad Religion

whatiremembered:

deviantdiya:

excuse me Frank Ocean but what is this Bad Religion you’re talking about…because I’m not liking what you’re getting at.

This is a poem, and you cannot ask it to be so literal.

It is sung from the perspective of a man who is in love with someone who does not love him back. He…

160 notes
posted 1 year ago (by: faineemae)
It’s a Hijab, Not a Halo

faineemae:

I promised myself that I would stay off of tumblr, but I needed to share this with people and I know that many of my Hijabi sisters would appreciate this, also my non-hijabi sisters who are struggling with Hijab. I’m going to posting some important parts but click on the title to read the full article.

It’s a Hijab, Not a Halo

By wearing the hijab, voluntarily or otherwise, we have presented ourselves as the role models of Islam. Hence whenever a hijabi does something wrong, the effect and repercussions are amplified in the eyes of the observers. Perhaps this is the reason that non-Muslims and non-hijabis are puzzled and often discouraged by the apparent disconnect between the adornment of the scarf and the beauty of Islam.

Hence, people are understandably bewildered when they see hijabi women backbite, quarrel, complain and unable to keep their rudeness or tempers in check. People question why some hijabis are fully compliant in their physical appearance, yet negligent with their Salah. People get a bad impression when they see some hijabis behave hysterically at concerts and football matches, flirt openly and behave lewdly. People wonder why selfish, stingy, arrogant and even abusive behaviour can be seen permeating through the physical barriers of veil. And ultimately, the sum total of all these incidents has led many to conclude that Islam starts and stops at the hijab.

So, let me make a general appeal. The hijab is not a halo. It does not render the wearer superhuman qualities. Underneath the garments is a normal human being with her own flaws and imperfections. And like everyone else, she is also susceptible to mistakes.

The scarf protects against a particular sin but it does not by itself eradicate negative habits and manners. Self-development remains an individual struggle which all of us, hijabis or not, should strive to overcome on a daily basis.

Thus I have come to realize that the scarf is neither the beginning nor the conclusion, it is merely one of the steps in our journey towards Allah.

The inner struggle continues:

  • to be constantly thankful and submissive to Allah for all His bounties upon us and what He has chosen for us.
  • To remember Allah in the good times and the bad.
  • To find peace and spread that peace within society.
  • And ultimately, to instill true shyness within ourselves –not just in the eyes of men, but also front of Allah for our conduct.

Let me be the first to admit it – I am so far from the ideal. I stumble, I freak out and I lose it sometimes. And it worries me whenever I deal with others because how I behave is no longer a reflection of myself as an individual, but rather a reflection of the Ummah as a collective. It was not a role that any of us asked for, but it came as part of the package when we started wearing the hijab and externally identified ourselves as Muslim women.

And now, I constantly ask myself – will my behaviour repulse others from Islam, or attract them towards it? The former is a scary thought. The latter, something to aspire towards.

I can only appeal to non-hijabi sisters sitting on the fence to forgive the occasional poor manners displayed by the hijabi sisters. Instead of judging them, please make du’a for them to rectify their shortcomings and be better ambassadors of our Deen. And ultimately, remember that the only relevant issue is what Allah wants of you, not how others behave.

The journey continues for all of us: whether hijabi or on the way to becoming one inshaAllah.