855 notes
posted 1 year ago (by: thesmithian)
thesmithian:


father and son are stranded on an Earth that has returned to a sort of wild, prehistoric state

more, plus trailer, here.

thesmithian:

father and son are stranded on an Earth that has returned to a sort of wild, prehistoric state

more, plus trailer, here.

1,194 notes
posted 1 year ago (by: obitoftheday)

alexandraerin:

obitoftheday:

Obit of the Day: Muppet Master Jerry Nelson

Lots of Muppets lost their voice today: Count von Count, Emmet Otter, Robin (Kermit’s nephew), Lew Zealand (of “boomerang fish” fame), Sherlock Hemlock, The Amazing Mumford (“A la peanut butter and jelly sandwiches!”), Harry Monster, Camilla the Chicken, and Gobo Fraggle.

Jerry Nelson, who passed away at the age of 78, met Jim Henson in New York City following the 1964 World’s Fair. Henson, who had met Nelson when Henson was performing Sam and Friends at WRC in Washington, D.C. and Nelson was an intern, asked Nelson to send an audition tape. Henson liked what he heard, except for Nelson’s take on Kermit.

Henson hired Nelson to replace Frank Oz as Rowlf the Dog’s right hand on the Jimmy Dean Show. Upon Oz’s return, Henson fired Nelson for lack of work but re-hired him when the Muppets were added to the cast of PBS’ newest educational program, Sesame Street.

Nelson would work with the Muppets from 1969 until his death on August 23, 2012. He retired from the physical aspect of puppeteering in 2004 but continued to voice his Sesame Street Muppets until his death. He was also given an uncredited cameo as the theater announcer in 2011’s film, The Muppets.

Random note: Jerry Nelson had a daughter, Christine, who suffered from cystic fibrosis. She passed away in 1982 at the age of 21. Jim Henson gave her a speaking role in The Great Muppet Caper, “Girl in Park,” which allowed her to join the Screen Actors’ Guild.

Sources: avclub.com, IMDB.com, Wikipedia.org

Images:

All characters copyright of the Jim Henson Company and Disney.

Count von Count - courtesy cnet.com

Lew Zealand - courtesy muppet.wikia.com

Emmet Otter - courtesy brianmastroianni.com

Robin the Frog - courtesy muppet.wikia.com

One moment of silence.

417 notes
posted 1 year ago (by: sugarbass)
125,499 notes
posted 1 year ago (by: trollifer)

dobrevobriens:

Stanley Tucci in Easy A

55,210 notes
posted 1 year ago (by: foreveralone-lyguy)

foreveralone-lyguy:

I found this in the theater while waiting to see the The Dark Knight Rises

4 notes
posted 1 year ago (by: moviestop10)
Movies: The Top 10...: An e-mail response to /Film about issues with TDKR

moviestop10:

This is an e-mail I sent in response to the article on /Film http://www.slashfilm.com/15-bothered-the-dark-knight-rises/

When and how did Bane find out about Batman’s identity and Applied Sciences?

-“Talia Al Ghul and Bane were trained when Taila was young and escaped the pit.”
Yes,…
27 notes
posted 1 year ago (by: gabeweb)
gabeweb:

The Myriad Monikers of Gotham’s Villains

This massive taxonomy charts the hundreds of villains who have menaced Gotham City over the past 70 years, breaking down by name everyone from big time baddies like the Joker and Bane to lesser known miscreants like the Walrus and Batzarro. A true rogues gallery of the superstitious and cowardly lot who have taken on the Dark Knight, this print is the definitive guide to Gotham mayhem.
Each print is signed and numbered by the artists, from a first edition of 500.

Using 100 lb. archival recycled stock certified by The Forest Stewardship Council, this print is produced with vegetable-based inks in Red Hook, Brooklyn.

(vía Pop Chart Lab)

gabeweb:

The Myriad Monikers of Gotham’s Villains

This massive taxonomy charts the hundreds of villains who have menaced Gotham City over the past 70 years, breaking down by name everyone from big time baddies like the Joker and Bane to lesser known miscreants like the Walrus and Batzarro. A true rogues gallery of the superstitious and cowardly lot who have taken on the Dark Knight, this print is the definitive guide to Gotham mayhem.

Each print is signed and numbered by the artists, from a first edition of 500.

Using 100 lb. archival recycled stock certified by The Forest Stewardship Council, this print is produced with vegetable-based inks in Red Hook, Brooklyn.

(vía Pop Chart Lab)

2 notes
posted 1 year ago (by: niteflight)
We're All Quite Sane: When it comes to superhero movies, the opinions of the comic fans are...

niteflight:

When it comes to superhero movies, the opinions of the comic fans are the last I take into consideration. It is not because I dislike them or think their opinions are not valid. It is because it seems like most will never be happy with any kind of adaptation that doesn’t kiss fanboy ass, no matter…

1 note
posted 1 year ago (by: timomorris)
What would a sequel to The Dark Knight Rises look like?

timomorris:

I saw The Dark Knight Rises. It currently stands now as my undisputed film of the year. Maybe even the best superhero film I’ve yet seen. It is a masterpiece of film-making. That said, the story does leave (at least some) opening for a sequel. io9 asks the question what would it look like?

Ultimately, I don’t think it needs it, the open-ended-ness felt important and useful to make you think about the film long after you leave the cinema- I still am, but this article is interesting speculation. Whilst it should go without saying, and the article reiterates this, massive spoilers ahead.

693 notes
posted 1 year ago (by: eddykenway)